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Shovels & Rope

Fri Oct 21st, 2022 at 7:00PM


Troubadour
9081 Santa Monica Boulevard
West Hollywood, CA 90069

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“It’s not heavy metal, but in our guts, it feels a bit like Heavy Metal,” says Michael Trent of the band’s new album, Manticore due Feb. 18. Next year, 2022, will mark ten years since Cary Ann Hearst and Michael Trent released their debut album O’ Be Joyful, the first formally billed as “Shovels & Rope.” That decade included the release of six full-length albums, three collaborative covers albums (Busted Jukebox Volumes 1-3), a curated music festival in their hometown of Charleston, SC (High Water), a musical film (Shovels & Rope: The Movie) and countless dynamic live performances all over the planet. But it was in the rear courtyard suite of the Decatur St. house belonging to the Preservation Hall Jazz Band in New Orleans where Michael and Cary Ann began polishing up the songs that became Manticore. There was a piano in the room and a little desk. There were piles of scattered and folded papers lying on the bed and copious digital ideas in the form of voice memos. And despite the pounding parades in the surrounding streets, it was quiet in the afternoon.

Months of relentless touring, partnering and parenting had left them threadbare, and the New Orleans stay was intended for finding time to think while renovations were happening at their house on Johns Island, SC. That time coincided with the last Mardi Gras before the world shut down and went into hiding. Sitting at the piano amid the pile of finished and unfinished lyrics, there was a bittersweetness and exhausted peace that belied the coming tribulations. The Decatur St. house would be the last stop on the year-long assembly line of songwriting on the fly. An image here and a rhyme there, scratched into a note pad for later. The next stop was The Whip, the home studio that was a refuge workspace in their backyard. They got back, put the laundry on, digested the news that the world was closed, the tour was canceled indefinitely, and the only thing to do was go inside. Inside the house, inside the studio, inside your mind and inside your time.

The songs and stories that make up Manticore are visceral, bold and at times deeply personal. And while all those adjectives could be used to describe the duo, this time around it rings true in a way that hits differently – or at least harder. Perhaps everything hits harder for everyone these days. And while most of these songs were written before the pandemic, they were all recorded at a time when everyone was inside. It takes aim at the human experience and does so without pulling a single punch: reflections on idol worship, homelessness, social justice, the experience of fierce parental love and marital strife are all on the menu here; and in true American fashion, the helpings are plentiful.

Manticore was initially intended to be a stripped back affair. The songs were written with the expectation that they would feature almost nothing but acoustic guitar, piano and their two voices. But with the time afforded to the band by the complete stalling of their industry,

they returned to the recordings and indulged the opportunity to expand the sound of the album with no pressures or expectations regarding the calendar. The most extended amount of time off the road since the band’s inception coupled with the creative outlet and subsequent work/life structure the album demanded created an anchor to some kind of sanity in a world that seemed to be truly losing its mind around them. “I was grateful to have something to work on, to go into the shop every day for a few hours, get into something, exercise parts of my brain and feel excited about something when there really wasn’t a whole lot to feel excited about at the time,” Michael Trent recalls of the process.

The stark personal musings of the songs on Manticore are somewhat contrasted by the opening track “Domino,” with its sleazy menace laced through a pulsing drum beat and Motown piano. It’s a rapid-fire lyrical collage of iconic American imagery depicting the death of James Dean, America’s reaction to it and Dean’s ghost’s puzzled bewilderment to that reaction. However, like all the best Shovels & Rope songs, there is a thematic duality on display, as it celebrates the playful elevation of rock’n’roll culture while exposing some of the ridiculousness of ‘celebrity’. “Collateral Damage” finds Cary Ann Hearst writing from the perspective of a woman who is openly musing about her role and identity as a woman in the modern world and as a mother in a modern family. As we’ve grown accustomed to, in some of their finest storytelling moments, the characters in these songs are often vehicles for their own deeply personal questions and feelings about the world around them. To that end, Manticore, is also unique in the Shovels & Rope catalog as some of the songs directly address their own marriage. “The Show” is an exaggerated version of a real-life discussion in New York City on separating real life from ‘stage’ life, and perhaps nowhere is this laid bare more than in one of the album’s emotional standouts, “Divide & Conquer.” Jokingly referred to as “Bummerham” in the early days of album tracking, the song does what ‘Birmingham’ did so well before in its embellished version of real-life recollections, but “Divide & Conquer” takes it a step further in openly imagining a fictional alternate reality where things don’t work out, and the children are divided between divorced parents. Dark to be sure, but the thought exercise concludes in a particularly touching self-awareness of how real and honest their partnership is and the desire to come back to that love and consistent force in each other’s lives. ‘Come back to me, here is my armor.’ That directness in addressing challenges in their own relationship for the first time wasn’t on accident. Cary Ann Hearst recalls of those songs, “it was like…no more mister nice guys, the polish is off, the humanity is in…the shiny perceptions or previous ideas of what we are, or are expected to be, are being mildly challenged in some of these songs in a different kind of way. In some ways it’s funny that we are addressing it now because our marriage is stronger than it’s ever been.” Perhaps the most raw and untamed outpouring of deeply personal feelings is in the album cornerstone, “Bleed Me.” Quite simply a love letter to their children, the song holds nothing back in its dramatic display of yearning, unfathomable love, exhaustion and, most of all, gratitude for the transformative experience of parenthood and the gifts that singular experience can bring to a person’s life. “I love how heavy handed it is, a little bit like screaming at the top of your lungs….My heart breaks every time we sing ‘you are the best part.’ That lyric means everything,” Hearst says of the song.

The album closes with the somber reflection of “Human Race”, a despairing ode to life in a troubled headspace. Appropriately, the song is more than just an album closer; it serves as a reminder of what still makes Shovels & Rope wholly unique, even ten years later amidst a sea of their peers. They are still master commentators of the human experience and maintain a rare gift that allows them to address the most gnarly of life’s lows while always keeping an eye on hope, compassion and community. The album’s title, Manticore, at its most simplistic, is a playful combination of a Leo and a Scorpio combined into one beast. A simple google search of the word will bring up depictions that are comical, fantastical, intimidating, aggressive, playful, beautiful and even mildly terrifying. At their best, all of these can be said of Shovels & Rope, but no matter which adjective feels most appropriate in a given song, show or album, it is always powerful. Thankfully, Manticore finds them at their (weary) best. It feels like a hard-won summation of the band’s first act, shedding away notions the public may have had of them or that they had of themselves. The second act of Shovels & Rope looks beautifully weathered and wiser – shining a bright light at the end of this very dark tunnel.

Tre Burt

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When

Tré Burt

was signed to

John Prine

’s Oh Boy Records in 2019, he
was one of only two artists

– including
label mate

Kelsey Waldon

, to join
the label in the past 15 years.

Caught It From The Rye

, Tré Burt’s
debut album was re-released on Oh Boy in Jan 2020. The album showcases Burt’s
literary songwriting and lo-fi, rootsy aesthetic, which he honed busking on the
streets of San Francisco and traveling the world in search of inspiration. Like
label mate and songwriting hero John Prine, Burt has a poet’s eye for detail, a
surgeon’s sense of narrative precision and a folk singer’s natural knack for a
timeless melody.

Caught It From The Rye

is an urgent missive from an important new voice in songwriting.

For a
songwriter who thoughtfully documents what he sees in the world, 2020, while
challenging, was rich with inspiration. The year birthed the single,

Under
The Devil’s Knee

, a song that continues the tradition of outspoken
political folk songwriters of yore. It is an incredibly moving protest song
tracing the lives of George Floyd, Eric Garner, and Breonna Taylor. Recorded
remotely featuring

Allison Russell

,

Sunny War

and

Leyla McCalla

. “

Humanity
feels like it’s slipping away from us, as a country. I wanted to reinstate the
humanity of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Eric Garner and so many other
brothers and sisters slain by police in the way I know how. I wanted to
immortalize their dignity and make the work easy for future historians and
remind the present that no matter what side of the aisle you’re on, this is
about actual pain and real human suffering caused by a system of governance
that is morally bankrupt. This, I felt was my duty as an American songwriter to
do. Music is a powerful force, especially when you put it through a protest
song. It makes the fight more tangible. Reframes perspective. None of which
entered my mind when writing this, at all. That was out of anger. I wrote this
song out of anger. They should all be alive.

” – Tré Burt

Tré’s
sophomore album,

You, Yeah, You

builds on
his previous work as “he grows ever more sophisticated, empathetic and razor
sharp as a storyteller and musical philosopher” – NPR. Recorded in North
Carolina with producer

Brad Cook

(

Bon Iver

,

Waxahatchee

,

Nathaniel
Rateliff

) the album reads like twelve rounds in a ring, summoning the will
to fight the unknown rather than surrender to fear and fatigue.

You,
Yeah, You

is a cohesive body of work that clearly illustrates the ever
expanding space in which Tré Burt’s voice belongs.

Tré
toured in summer 2021 with

Nathaniel
Rateliff and the Night Sweats

and

Shakey
Graves

as well as making his

Newport
Folk Festival

debut performance, “Tré Burt blazes his own troubadour path,
a powerful and moving debut from a singer poised to become a folk festival
mainstay for years to come”

Rolling
Stone

Following
a support tour with

Watchhouse

, a
performance at the venerable

LUCK
Reunion

on

Willie Nelson

’s
ranch, and

the 2022 release of the EP

Know
Your Demons,

Burt heads out on his
long awaited debut headline tour in the US and Europe and summer festival
touring to include Under The Big Sky, Hinterland and numerous other festivals.

9081 Santa Monica Boulevard West Hollywood, CA 90069 (Get Directions)

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